Author Archives: Faversham Creek Trust

Image

2014 Faversham Nautical Festival July 12-13

Fav Nautical Fest 2014

Image

Faversham Creek & its Heritage 10th July

Fac Soc10thJulyPoster

The Draft Plan, the Alternative Plan, and the Town Council

Various options for the Swan Quay, Coach Depot and Oil Depot sites together with alternative strategies were recently excluded from the consultation draft of the Neighbourhood Plan. However an undertaking was given (both at a Steering Group meeting and a Faversham Town Council meeting) that alternative proposals would be sought as part of the consultation process.

The Brents Community Association and this Trust felt it was difficult for people to make informed and meaningful responses without knowing what the alternatives were, and the reasoning behind them. We also wanted to consult our membership (as we are required to do by the Steering Group’s Terms of Reference) before putting forward our own responses to the consultation.

We therefore decided to mount an exhibition for our members and for the public. It set out a different strategy together with alternative options alongside those in the draft Plan. BMM Weston joined us to consult on the company’s plans for redevelopment of its sites and regeneration of the Creek basin.

Throughout, we encouraged the public to engage with the Town Council’s consultation and complete the Questionnaire, partly through flyers that gave links to the Council’s website and details of the Council’s events.

With the help of an independent expert we developed a questionnaire survey which people were invited to complete before leaving our exhibition (copy attached). An online version is also available. As of 28th June, 840 people had attended the various exhibition sessions and just over half (450) had completed the survey.

Our survey analysis, to be carried out in accordance with independent professional advice, will not be completed until after the final exhibition session on 28 June; however the interim findings show some striking trends. In particular, the large majority (86%) of respondents favoured a regeneration strategy based on business, boats and community facilities, compared with under 2% in favour of a strategy focused on housing and footpaths. The remainder were uncertain or suggested various combinations.

This reflects previous consultations in 2012 and 2013, when the majority of people were clear that they did not want a plan for the Creek that prioritised waterfront housing.

What remains is for the Town Council to decide whether to reinstate our two organisations into the Steering Group, along with our evidence based mission to ensure that these findings are reflected in the Neighbourhood Plan, or whether to continue to reject alternatives to the current Draft Plan.

R. Telford

 

HAVE YOU COMPLETED THE QUESTIONNAIRE

THE DRAFT NEIGHBOURHOOD PLAN QUESTIONNAIRE MUST BE COMPLETED BY MONDAY 30TH.

PLEASE PLEASE COMPLETE THIS, OR AS MUCH OF IT AS YOU CAN. IT DOES NOT REQUIRE A FULL UNDERSTANDING OF ALL THE SUPPORTING INFORMATION SUCH AS THE EVIDENCE BASE.

IT IS VERY IMPORTANT THAT THERE IS A GOOD RESPONSE TO THIS CONSULTATION AS THE LEVEL OF RESPONSE WILL BE TAKEN AS AN INDICATION OF INTEREST IN THE PLAN.

ALL THE INFORMATION AND THE QUESTIONNAIRE CAN BE FOUND HERE,

http://favershamcreekneighbourhoodplan.org.uk/consultation/

Next Tuesdays Talk – Dr Pat Reid, Archaeologist

Tuesday 24 June at 2.30pm

in the Fleur Hall, Gatefield Lane.

Dr Pat Reid will talk about the
“The Archaeology of the Upper Creek”

Usual format, Talk at 2.30 and Tea and cakes after, donations kindly accepted towards the costs of the hall etc.

Next months lecture on ‘The Wildlife of the Creek’ will be on 22 July

 

The Truth about the NPPF

A STATEMENT FROM THE FAVERSHAM CREEK TRUST AND THE BRENTS COMMUNITY ASSOCIATION

In a letter to the Faversham News about the Neighbourhood Plan (June 12), steering group chairman Nigel Kay complained that people were given misleading information about what is possible and what is not.

Unfortunately, the information he himself provided was misleading.

DELIVERABILITY

Before it is allowed to go to a referendum, the Plan will have to be approved by an independent examiner. Mr Kay says that alternative proposals cannot be considered by the steering group without business plans and financial information, because theses will be required by the examiner as evidence that the Plan is deliverable.

This is not correct. A study of successful neighbourhood plans shows that examiners do not ask for such evidence, nor are they entitled to do so. “The legislation does not permit me to examine the soundness or quality of the plan,” says one of them. (And if Mr Kay truly believes that such evidence is necessary, why has he not demanded it for all the “official” proposals? There is much less information on those in the public domain than there is on alternative options.)

WHAT THE NPPF SAYS

This is how the National Planning Policy Framework (NPPF), paragraph 173, explains deliverability: “The sites and the scale of development identified in the plan should not be subject to such a scale of obligations and policy burdens that their ability to be delivered viably is threatened.”

So, for example, a plan may have policies on affordable housing quotas, or sustainable building standards, or financial contributions that developers have to pay: if these are too demanding, it could be deemed undeliverable.

VIABILITY

There is a distinction between:

(a) viability in the context of MAKING a plan, which is what concerns us now. This applies to the plan as a whole rather than individual sites: in principle, the policies should not hinder the kind of development that would be needed to achieve the desired outcome – eg, by imposing conditions that would make development so difficult or expensive that it would be unlikely to happen), and

(b) viability in the context of USING a plan, which is what happens when a specific planning application is made for a particular site: in practice, if the development is in general accordance with the plan but policy conditions make it impossible for a “reasonable” landowner/developer to make a fair return by current market standards, those conditions may be relaxed – for example, developers may be allowed a lower proportion of affordable housing than is laid down in the plan.

LANDOWNER AGREEMENT

Independent examiners of Neighbourhood Plans do not demand agreement from each individual landowner. Some neighbourhood plans have barely consulted landowners at all; the examiner of the plan for Thame (Oxfordshire) points out that there is no statutory requirement to do so. Some plans that were actively opposed by landowners and developers have nevertheless succeeded at examination – and, in the case of Tattenhall (Cheshire), at a subsequent judicial inquiry.

Examiners have accepted that delivery may involve future negotiations with landowners during the lifetime of the plan. For example, the plan for Kirdford (West Sussex) has a 15-year table showing timescales and priorities and what actions will be needed at various stages, including landowner negotiations.

PLAN PERIOD

The Faversham Creek plan has no such sense of timescale. The staging of delivery has never been discussed. It doesn’t even say what period it’s meant to cover, though this is a legal requirement (section 38B of the 2004 Planning and Compulsory Purchase Act) and examiners can get quite stroppy if it’s left out.

Without timescales it’s impossible to judge feasibility. Something that might be not be achievable in five years may well be achievable in ten or fifteen.

MISINFORMATION?

Mr Kay and some other members of the steering group frequently assert that those proposing alternative ideas for the Creek are an unrepresentative and ill-informed minority who do not understand the realities of neighbourhood planning.

In fact, these alternative ideas are in line with the majority views expressed at public consultations, and their proponents have done a great deal of research into the rules and regulations, and to what is happening in practice with neighbourhood plans elsewhere (there are lots of them in progress and, at the time of writing, 17 have succeeded at referendum).

The Faversham Creek Trust’s steering group representative took the trouble to attend a three-day planning camp to understand more about the process – how many other steering group members have shown such commitment? Others have studied successful plans and their examiners’ reports to see what can be learned from them. They are all different, but there are common themes.

One thing examiners consistently look for is evidence that there has been open and meaningful community engagement and properly considered responses to consultation feedback.

It will be interesting to see their reaction to the Faversham Creek Plan.

 

The Race in the Basin

IMG_1083

A peaceful start

Sunday saw our second annual dinghy race in the Faversham Creek Basin successfully completed in good weather with a nice breeze; in fact unlike last years flat calm, there were some interesting puffs to liven things up a bit.

screenshot

return on the first lap

IMG_1088

the lead changes

IMG_1096

the puffs

Twice around the buoys for the eight boats, twice as many as last year, and won by twelve year old Ella Jameson in her laser, Whistle.

There was a good crowd and many followed the race along the footpath to the turning buoy at Morrisons wharf, and back.

Deputy mayor Cllr Jane Hawkins very kindly agreed to do the starting and finishing honours with the air horn, nervous at first, she quickly got the hang of it and then there was no stopping her. She was delighted to give the cup to Ella, who at 12 has a future as a sailor; dad is the shipwright and sailor, Simon Grillet.

IMG_1125

the winner

Trust Chairman Prof Chris Wright thanked everyone who had taken part, including the Sea Cadets, and said the race was started to show how much the community would benefit once the Creek Basin has been brought back into use for local people with an interest in boating, and as an event for spectators and visitors.

IMG_1130

stacked boat

One of the contestants, Alan Thorne, raced his brand-new nesting dinghy ‘The PuriFlyer’ which has been built in the Trust’s Purifier Building. It splits into two separate halves which can be stacked on the deck of a boat.

IMG_1107

too close

Another contestant, local fireman Tim Mulcahy who learned to sail on the Creek as a schoolboy, had bought his boat only 3 days ago, but gave Ella some competition, as did Alan in the Puriflier, and Alan Staley.

It  was a great atmosphere, something that the Creek always seems to generate, and we look forward to the next Creek event, the Nautical Festival in July [12/13] organised by the Kent Sail Association.

 

 

IMG_1092

Duelling on the last lap

Andrew in the folding boat

Andrew in his folding boat

 

 

IMG_1142

mmm I need to modify my rig..

 

Boys in a boat

Boys in a boat

young sailors

young sailors

Chris Wright and the Patron Sir David Melville

Chris Wright and our Patron Sir David Melville

Boat Folding

Boat Folding