BOAT CAMP a new project

This is what we’re about and we think that you’ll be pleased to hear about our new project – Boat Camp! We’ve reached a stage where we can get local young people building boats!

Ten lucky students from Faversham’s Abbey School will take part in the BoatCamp fortnight to build 2 wooden rowing boats. 

The Boat Camp will be run in the Creek Trust’s Purifier Building during the holidays. The project is headed by Alan Thorne and his team – they recently trained local back-to-work groups to build a small fleet of mouse-boats and also the Kingfisher punt, now used to clear rubbish from Stonebridge Pond.

Here’s a line-up of the Creek Trust’s BoatCamp team: Linda Thomas, Trust chairman Sue Akhurst, boat-builder & course tutor Alan Thorne, James Rubinstein and Gulliver Imminck.  IMG_1320

However, the team need £8000 to run the course, and the Trust is now fundraising to pay for this course, and you can show your support by going to givey.com/boatcamps

This online donation website has been set up by Alan who completed the round-the-Isle-of-Wight sailing race at the weekend to help raise money for the BoatCamp. All the money raised from sponsoring him in that race will go towards the Boat Camp. He has successfully used this method in previous years to help finance sailing-training for disadvantaged young people.

We are of course also fundraising from other sources, and are happy to accept direct donations for this project. We are sure our members will want to help support this marvellous opportunity which exactly matches our objectives…. to train new shipwrights and get people more involved with the Creek.

This is an excellent starter project which has taken a long time to set up, working with the staff and students of the school, and the local shipwrights, and the boat designer – a New Zealander! Maybe in future we’ll have some home-grown boat-designers to help spread this idea round the world.

Please do give us your support.

givey.com/boatcamps .

Fundraising Dinner at Brents Tavern Sat 2nd July

If you were lucky enough to have one of only 32 tickets for last year’s Swing the Bridge Dinner at the Brents Tavern

You won’t want to miss this year’s Summer Dinner!

Brents Dinner 2016 Poster

SWALE REGATTA 17 – 19 June

For full details and entry, go to the Regatta website at    http://www.swaleregatta.co.uk

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Time to shake more hands

Last week, Councillor Shiel Campbell was appointed the new Mayor of Faversham, and a very popular Mayor she will be, judging by the reception she received, especially for her speech.
In her speech she highlighted three things that she wants to promote in her Mayoral year and the first is reprinted here;

– “to build on and extend the levels of communication and co-operation with town residents and businesses. It is a natural progression of the digital age that we live in that information can be quickly and easily sourced via websites and I would like to see this encouraging more people to come along to the Town Council meetings and take part, in a co-operative, collaborative way. I believe we can get much more done by working together and building bonds. So much more is achieved with a congenial conversation over a coffee than a correspondence clash via the local papers”.

This is especially important for this Trust because we have been in the centre of the debate over the Creek Neighbourhood Plan, along with the Brents Community Association, for the last four years. It could not be avoided.

During this time, we have carried out a policy of avoiding the use of the local press as the forum for debate, and keeping to the principal of constructive discussion; there have been challenging moments, and unfortunately this Trust has inevitably been associated with some of the more unpleasant events, even though they were absolutely outside our jurisdiction.

It was recognised a long time ago that, as Shiel said, much more is achieved over a cup of coffee, so a number of local people with different views in relation to the NP, but agreeing that more open discussion was needed than had been available, decided to meet on an informal basis to do just that.

These meetings were not secret, although they were by invitation, and without agenda, or minutes, but chaired by an acknowledged independent. The dialogue as it was referred to, was free ranging and allowed participants to speak their mind, and debate the issues surrounding the NP; it was not always without passion.

In that respect they were very successful even though there were no specific conclusions that directly affected the very formal NP meetings. How much people’s views were changed is not known but this author’s feeling is that some were; at the very least, people with opposing views were able to walk out smiling, together and not walk on opposite sides of the street.

So now we have a formal opportunity, with support from the Mayor, to mend bridges that were damaged and reach out and openly accept the compromise that the NP will be. It must be approved at Referendum, the consequences otherwise are unthinkable, so we must promote that.

The Trust and its many supporters also have the opportunity to benefit from the Mayor’s decision to make us her principal charity. The good work that has being going on all this time, not always realised by the Town Council and others, should get the recognition that it deserves, and that will go a long way to mending bridges and building new ones.

This Trust accepted the responsibility to raise £125,000 at short notice, in a short timescale, much from the people of the town, as affirmation of our commitment to the future of the Creek. We are all in this together now; Councillors at all levels, local representative groups and businesses; it is time to start shaking more hands.

Bob Telford, Trustee and Board member.

Chris Wright at the Fleur on Thursday 19th

Chris Wright on Space, Time and Faversham Creek

Thursday 19th May at 7.30 pm

in the Fleur Hall, Gatefield Lane

ALSO

NEIGHBOURHOOD PLAN REPORT WELCOMED

Introduction
The Faversham Creek Trust and the Brents Community Association welcome the Independent Examiner’s report on the Faversham Creek Neighbourhood Plan.

As you, our Members and Supporters know, we worked closely together to present an alternative view for the regeneration of Faversham Creek, including representing our organisations at the three day Public Hearing in October 2015.

We welcome the Examiner’s recommendation that, subject to the incorporation of all his amendments, the plan may go to referendum with the whole of Faversham being given a vote.

We trust that Faversham Town Council and Swale Borough Council will agree to incorporate all the required changes so that the Faversham Creek Neighbourhood Plan may be brought to referendum without delay. Swale has stated that the referendum will take place in September or October this year.

The Examiner’s Report can be downloaded as a pdf here: Faversham-Creek-NDP-Report-Final

What happens next
The amendments required by the Examiner’s Report will be discussed at the Swale Borough Council Local Development Framework Panel Meeting on Thursday 19th May (7 pm at Swale House). The agenda and papers can be seen here: LDFP Meeting .

This meeting will also discuss proposed modifications to the Swale Local Plan, including significant additional housing development sites for the Faversham area, raising the possible total for the plan period (to 2030) from 905 houses to 1,708, and increase of 89%.

The Planning Officers’ report can be seen here on Page 6.;  Public reports pack 19052016 1900 Local Development Framework Panel

Main recommendations in the Report
The Examiner, Mr Timothy Jones, clearly listened carefully and objectively to all sides, and took time to study the Creekside area at all states of the tide, in order to understand it. While he has not accepted all the changes we had put forward, on the whole we believe he has been fair to everyone.

We consider that the changes he has recommended will enable the plan to be seen as a defining document for Faversham’s future, in particular by requiring greater attention to the archaeological importance of the Creek and robust protection of existing important buildings, waterside features and employment opportunities.

It was especially useful to have the Neighbourhood Plan set in the context of the strategic policies B1 and AAP2 of the adopted Swale Local Plan 2008, which focus on employment and protection of the maritime character of the Creek – for which we had consistently argued during the development of the plan.

Purifier Building
We are delighted with the Examiner’s recognition of the work being carried out by the Trust at the Purifier Building. This is what he said:

“I was impressed by the use for boatbuilding and for training in maritime skills to which the Purifier Building is being put. I was also impressed with the building itself. This use contributes to sustainability and should be protected both from development on the site and from nearby development that might cause problems for the building continuing its present use. That use is a mixed use that includes B2 use, some of which is in the open air. Bearing in mind my accompanied site visit, I accept Ms Akhurst’s evidence in respect of use.”

Mr Jones has required that the existing policy for the Purifier should be replaced with this one:

“P1: The building and its curtilage are to be used for small business workshops, together with associated educational uses (mixed use B1, B2 and D1.)”

Ordnance Wharf
While we are disappointed that Mr Jones has accepted residential development on Ordnance Wharf, we are pleased that he has specified policies which will protect both the Purifier and our archaeological heritage.

Swan Quay
Mr Jones has not ruled out any development on Swan Quay, but he has rejected housing. An extract from his recommended changes is:

“Land uses could include offices/workshops (Class B1), maritime general industrial (B2 limited by condition) and a gallery (Class D1) and some limited car parking, but not dwelling houses (Class C3). It may be possible to permit new building consistent with the site’s current character. If so, they should be constructed in yellow stock brickwork and slate roof with metal framed windows.”

Other sites
The policies for the remaining sites have been accepted, with some changes to Standard House. This will permit housing on the Oil Depot and Coach Depot. Standard Quay is unchanged. Stronger requirements for archaeological investigations apply to these sites.

Thank you
For the Brents Community Association, Chairman Mike Palmer said: “Working as we do to improve job opportunities for local unemployed people, we are encouraged by the importance the Examiner placed on employment uses. We also appreciate his comments on the Purifier Building, which we have used on our employment courses and where many local residents have worked as volunteers, and his recommendations for Swan Quay, which will help to protect the character of our local area.”

Our two organisations would like to thank the many people who have contributed to our efforts to present alternative ideas for the potential development of the Faversham Creek area, including Dr Pat Reid, Ray Harrison, the Faversham Society, Historic England – and the many hundreds of people from Faversham and further afield who have contributed to the consultations and the debate, and who have given their time and money towards the new Swing Bridge, which is such a vital part of regenerating Faversham Creek.

We are continuing to work with Kent County Council, Swale Borough Council and Faversham Town Council to ensure that Faversham gets an opening bridge again. Both our organisations have a representative on the Steering Group for this project and are closely involved.

Conrad Broadley Talk at the Purifier Monday 25th

MONDAY 25 APRIL AT 7.30 PM
IN THE PURIFIER BUILDING

Conrad Broadley – Restoring Creeks along the Thames
Conrad will talk about the Northfleet, Dartford and Crayford Creek Restoration

Read about his work here:
http://www.northfleetharbour.org.uk/